The company reported first quarter revenues of $163.5 million in fiscal 2009 versus $190.1 million reported in the prior year period. Income from continuing operations for the first quarter of fiscal 2009 totaled $12.1 million, or $0.25 per diluted share, versus $20.8 million, or $0.41 per diluted share, reported in the prior year period. As previously announced, first quarter results included a $5.7 million after-tax restructuring charge for workforce and facility reductions, or $0.12 cents per diluted share.  

 

First Quarter Fiscal2009 Revenue Highlights Revenues for first quarter fiscal 2009 across each of the company’s four operating segments were as follows:

  • Strategy Machine® Solutions revenues were $87.6 million in the first quarter compared to $97.4 million in the prior year quarter, or a decrease of 10%, primarily due to a decline associated with fraud, marketing solutions and collections and recovery, partially offset by an increase in revenues derived from consumer products.
  • Scoring Solutions revenues were $34.1 million in the first quarter compared to $42.7 million in the prior year quarter, or a decrease of 20%, primarily due to a decrease in revenues derived from our credit bureau risk scores. Professional Services revenues were $27.8 million in the first quarter compared to $36.0 million in the prior year quarter, or a decrease of 23%, primarily due to a decline associated with customized analytic implementation services, collections and recovery services and customer management services partially offset by an increase in revenues derived from tools services.
  • Analytic Software Tools revenues increased to $14.0 million in the first quarter compared to $13.9 million in the prior year quarter, essentially flat with the prior year period. 
  • Bookings Highlights from Continuing Operations: The bookings for the first quarter were $52.5 million compared to $92.7 million in the same period last year. The company defines a “new booking” as estimated future contractual revenues, including agreements with perpetual, multi-year and annual terms. Management regards the volume of new bookings achieved as one indicator of future revenues, but they are not comparable to, nor should they be substituted for, an analysis of the company’s revenues. Source: Fair Isaac
BIIA Newsletter February – 2009 Issue